[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: [dinosaur] Tyrannosaurus second largest theropod?




On Thu, Oct 26th, 2017 at 1:22 AM, Poekilopleuron <dinosaurtom2015@seznam.cz> 
wrote:

> Good day,
> 
> would you agree that the _T. rex_ is currently the second largest known 
> theropod species after _S. aegyptiacus_, based on this:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-
3A__www&d=DwIFaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=OE7FUTnXiysYdPrOqc6RbLFWEvAxhk6e6k41k1uIIhE&s=Pun7rCN8vASybvrhBviqn_Mig8
GhX1lowkKEKtznELk&e=.
> skeletaldrawing.com/home/mass-estimates-north-vs-south-redux772013?rq=
> tyrannosaurus ? Thank you in advance, Tom

It depends on what you mean by 'largest' (longest, tallest, widest, heaviest, 
etc). If it's mass you're interested in,
then I'd take any mass estimates with a grain of salt. The error range of the 
mass estimates for any two theropod
species could potentially overlap. If the largest known theropod species all 
hovered around the upper biological limit 
for bipedal dinosaurs, then it wouldn't be surprising if their maximum masses 
were very similar.


-- 
_____________________________________________________________

 Dann Pigdon
 GIS Officer
 Melbourne, Australia
_____________________________________________________________