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[dinosaur] CORRECTION: Pterosaur pelvic material [tyrannosaur squamosal] from Late Cretaceous Dinosaur Park Formation in Alberta (free pdf)




Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


Another tyrannosaur item for today:



Gregory F. Funston, Elizabeth Martin-Silverstone & Philip J. Currie (2018)
Correction: The first pterosaur pelvic material from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Campanian) and implications for azhdarchid locomotion.
FACETS 3: 192â194
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1139/facets-2018-0006
http://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/10.1139/facets-2018-0006

Free pdf:

http://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/facets-2018-0006




UALVP 56200, originally identified as a partial pelvis of an azhdarchid pterosaur, is a badly broken tyrannosaurid squamosal. Previous conclusions presented about pelvic myology and locomotion in azhdarchids are unsubstantiated and should be disregarded. UALVP 56200 is briefly redescribed here as a squamosal, and provides insights on the extent of cranial pneumaticity in tyrannosaurids.


Blog post:


https://gregfunston.wordpress.com/2018/02/23/these-hips-did-lie/




On Tue, Jul 11, 2017 at 7:55 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:

Ben Creisler

A new paper in open access:



Gregory F. Funston, Elizabeth Martin-Silverstone & ÂPhilip J. Currie (2017)
The first pterosaur pelvic material from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Campanian) and implications for azhdarchid locomotion.
FACETS 2: 559â574
DOI: 10.1139/facets-2016-0067

Free pdf:


A partial pterosaur pelvis from the Campanian Dinosaur Park Formation of Canada adds to our knowledge of Late Cretaceous pterosaurs. The pelvis is tentatively referred to Azhdarchidae and represents the first pelvic material from a North American azhdarchid. The morphology of the ilium is bizarre compared with other pterosaurs: it is highly pneumatized, the preacetabular process tapers anteriorly, and muscle scars show that it would have anchored strong adductor musculature for the hindlimb. The acetabulum is deep and faces ventrolaterally, allowing the limb to be positioned underneath the body. These features support previous suggestions that azhdarchids were well adapted to terrestrial locomotion.



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